Mountain and Rustic House Plans

Mountain homes come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Rather than being an architectural distinction, mountain house plans represent a collection of common features designed for rugged landscapes. Also called Rustic house plans, these homes tend to be on the smaller side and boast design elements perfect for vacation homes in beautiful settings.

Natural materials are often used in mountain house construction: treated wood siding, unfinished logs, and stone elements are commonly seen in these types of homes. Metal roofs are desirable for their low maintenance as much as for the uniquely peaceful sound of rainfall they provide. A mountain house plan will often have lots of windows from which you can watch the changing of the seasons. Formal rooms are replaced with cozy gathering spaces usually centered around a stone fireplace. Traditionally open designs make these smaller mountain house plans feel simultaneously expansive and intimate. A rustic house plan will have several covered patios or a wrap-around porch for taking in the fresh mountain air.

Seasonal weather in mountainous areas can be unpredictable and extreme, and a good rustic house plan will reflect the sturdiness required to withstand colder seasons. A-frame designs are quite popular in areas where annual snowfall is high, while other mountain house plans will be multiple stories high to separate bedrooms from living areas and are suitable for building on a sloping lot. It is somewhat common for a mountain house plan to not include a garage, as these are often used as vacation homes. However, for those attracted to the style and wish for a permanent residence with a rustic feel, garages can either be added to existing plans or you can choose from the many larger sized mountain house plans that include space for storing vehicles.

Having a quiet place to escape to feels vital for many families living in densely populated areas. And for those who cannot build their dream home just yet, a vacation property is an approachable first step: a uniquely designed home on a slightly smaller scale and perfectly suited to your family’s needs is a choice everyone can get behind.

 

Search for Mountain and Rustic House Plans here

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A Vacation Home Is A Solid Investment

There are numerous studies to show that Americans take trips more frequently when they have a permanent vacation home as a destination. The peace of mind that comes from staying in your own space is a powerful motivator, and the ability to store necessities on site is yet another big incentive. In the busy lives we live, time away from the daily grind can be hard to come by. Vacations are complicated things to pull off: making travel arrangements, taking time off from work, packing, researching, and staying in unfamiliar accommodations can all put a damper on the experience, and many people just don’t have the spare time to put all the details in order.

Especially popular in recent years are vacation homes in the mountains.  These rugged, sturdy floor plans are designed to withstand seasonal storms and provide a haven from day to day life all year long. Typically low-maintenance materials are used in construction and mountain house plans are uniquely suited for sloped lots and breath-taking views.

Whether you build a fishing cabin in the mountains  or a beach cottage on the coast, there are numerous benefits to be found in building a custom vacation home:

  1. Tax Incentive

Depending on the tax laws in your state, there is a possibility that you can write off the property value from your annual income. Check with a professional in the area you want to build to make sure you’re getting the most accurate tax advice.

  1. Earned Rental Income

Many folks don’t mind others using their vacation home and with the advent of sites like Air B&B and VRBO home owners can generate income by renting their vacation properties when not in use.

  1. Vacations are Good for Your Health

There are countless medical studies to show the positive effects of fresh air and the increased activity that mountain travel inspires. Lowered blood pressure, increased oxygen in the body, and a relaxed state of mind have all been linked in correlation to longevity and lower incidences of major chronic health issues.

For many families who feel that building their dream home is out of reach at this time, considering a vacation home is a perfect first step. Smaller in scale and often quite simple in design, working from a floor plan that had been modified to your specifications makes the possibility of regular vacations a reality.

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Nostalgic American Architecture is Perfect for the Holidays

There is perhaps no season that makes many of us nostalgic for early American architecture like autumn. As leaves begin to turn bright colors and fall in piles in the front yard, kids dress up and parole neighborhood streets for Hallowe’en, and preparations are made for the upcoming holidays, images of colonial homes fill our heads. Those wide front porches decorated with carved pumpkins and hardy mums in pots; lights going up along roof lines; chimneys filling the air with wood smoke….these sensory moments are part of what makes this season so special and culturally historical.

A nostalgic American landscape makes for the ultimate autumn landscape

A nostalgic American landscape makes for the ultimate autumn landscape and puts us in mind of the approaching holidays.

When we enter the season of hosting for the holidays, there are some styles of homes that are designed for this time of year. And it’s those nostalgic American home styles that do it the very best: Colonial, Plantation style, and Country homes are among the most perennially popular. Especially as the season turns cold, those homes that offer multiple fireplaces, large gathering rooms, and guest accommodations are especially sought after. And for large families, no holiday would be able to come together without some sort of play room or bonus space on the lower floors to which the children can be sent while meal preparations are under way.

As adults grow their families and develop traditions, it’s only natural to consider how your family gathers together. In the midst of holiday craziness and unpredictable weather, how to spend time with your loved ones? These are some of the most important considerations when searching for a house plan for your dream home. Are you building far from other family members, where you might need to host overnight guests from time to time? Do you prepare large meals and require ample storage and counter space to work your masterpieces? Is quiet time around the fireplace the best part of your night? As you search through our curated collections of house plans for holiday hosting, keep in mind the spaces in which you want to see your most beloved traditions to take place. Whether your hang lights, or decorate with autumn colored leaves, this holiday season is shaping up to be a wonderful time for all to get together and revel in the joy of a life well lived.

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Autumn Curb Appeal for your Front Porch

Autumn is upon us, and it appears in all its colorful glory. It is the time of Hallowe’en costumes, darker days, pumpkin flavored everything. This time of year, we showcase our beautiful homes and extend our front porch space to friends and family alike as we welcome them to our homes for a string of holiday get-togethers.

Front porches are even more welcoming with festive fall decor.

Front porches are even more welcoming with festive fall decor.

Whether you have a walkway to your front door or a covered front porch where guests can take shelter from stormy weather, a visitor’s experience in your home begins with curb appeal. Those few moments between leaving the car and arriving at your door are filled with observation and the slow exposure to your cultivated environment.

Seasonal decorations bring out the exterior features of your home and share your enthusiasm for the holidays. Carved pumpkins lining front porch steps is a long tradition in this country, as are illuminated pathways. As the evening falls earlier and earlier, using decorative lights in your front

Carved pumpkins line the steps of this spooky front porch.

Carved pumpkins line the steps of this spooky front porch.

yard is not only functional, but can highlight design and landscaping features. Trees known for spectacular fall foliage make grand statements as well.

The focus on the front yard this time of year highlights house plan features that might otherwise go overlooked. A front porch, for many, is an intentional aesthetic that represents the style of the homeowners. But why beautify the front of your home just for visitors to enjoy? Some of the most perennially popular house plans feature large windows in the front façade, serving both as a welcoming openness to guests and to offer a view of the front yard from home offices, sitting rooms, and salons. House plans featuring wide covered patios or wrap around porches encourage year-round enjoyment.

 

Enjoy your front porch and yard with a house plans that features lots of front-facing windows.

Enjoy your front porch and yard with a house plans that features lots of front-facing windows.

Your front porch and yard are an extension of your home, and reflect your unique style. Changing seasons offer us the chance to highlight the gorgeous features of our homes. Whether your family is holiday-driven or more classic in style, this is one area where “keeping up appearances” is an extension of welcome and graceful hosting.

 

Browse our collection of house plans with covered front porches here.

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Storm Savvy House Plans

The storm season is upon us!

The storm season is upon us!

For those of you who welcome the return of the Storm Watching Season, you know first-hand the value of certain house plans with features that make cold weather easy to enjoy inside a safe and cozy home. Whether you live on one of the coastlines or make your home on land located somewhere in between, winter is full of dynamic and intense weather systems that move across our landscapes with startling regularity.

There are some obvious weather concerns that an architect and a builder will pay close attention to: proximity to tide-affected water, for example, or a lot in hurricane-prone areas will inform many of the structural decisions to be made when building your dream home. In fact, this is one of the major reasons families opt to build from custom house plans rather than buy a pre-built home: it is a precious opportunity to cater the needs of your family to the demands of your specific region.

But even beyond these important concerns, there are smaller details to think about that are no less important as we head into the rough weather and low temperatures of a North American winter. When searching through house plans of the various homes that catch your eye, also think about the things that help you to feel safe when some of your amenities are unavailable.

Keeping Rooms

The keeping room serves a gathering place for busy families.

The keeping room in this house plan serves a gathering place for busy families.

Many house plans include a keeping or hearth room adjacent to the kitchen. These rooms typically have a wood burning fireplace and an open space in which your family can gather when the rest of the house is a bit chilly.  These keeping or hearth rooms were a staple in early American Southern-style homes. The keeping room is an informal and cozy space; often these are rooms with few electronic devices and plenty of comfortable seating.

Outdoor Kitchens

Outdoor kitchens provide cooking alternatives when the power goes out during storm season.

Outdoor kitchens provide cooking alternatives when the power goes out during storm season.

Not just for summer bbq’s, a built-in outdoor kitchen is typically an enclosed space to keep out inclement weather and regulate temperature and ventilation while cooking. If you live in a place where electricity can go out for extended periods of time, having an alternate place to prepare meals and still be protected from the elements can make all the difference when in the midst of a storm. A non-electric grill is typically built in to these outdoor kitchens, but wood burning fireplaces are also common additions. Dress up your fireplace with a cooking grate and a roasting spit from which to hang a pot of steaming soup and you’ll hardly even notice when the lights come back on!

Walk-In / Butler’s Pantries

Wrought iron gates at the entry of the walk-in pantry lend an artistic flair to this breathtaking kitchen

Wrought iron gates at the entry of the walk-in pantry lend an artistic flair to this breathtaking kitchen.

When the bad weather warnings come, many families feel the need to stock up on essentials. Whether you preserve a seasonal harvest or head to the local shop for canned soups and bottled water, having these necessities on hand helps everyone feel more at ease when facing a stormy season. A generous pantry provides lots of space for your supplies and makes keeping track of what’s on hand a cinch.

The ability to craft exactly what your family needs into your dream house plan is exactly why so many people are choosing to build rather than buy a pre-made house. Consider the seasonal factors in your area and include in your floor plan the features that will best serve your unique family. To get started, browse through these curated collections here:

Browse house plans with Outdoor Kitchens here.

Browse house plans with Keeping / Hearth rooms here.

Browse house plans with Walk-In / Butler’s Pantries here.

And follow us on Pinterest for more Curated House Plan Collections here

 

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California Bungalow: An American Original

The term California Bungalow refers to more than just an architectural style. Referencing a time and place in American history, the classic California Bungalow home design reflects an early stage in the development of the American Dream.

A Bengal Bungalow in 1865 belonging to a British military commander.

A Bengal Bungalow in 1865 belonging to a British military commander.

Bungalows have been built for centuries overseas, primarily in the Bengal region of India, where the term originates. Popular with British commanders, the traditional thatched-roof home style was adapted to house the military elite and influenced house design across the world. The bungalow’s first appearance in the United States was on the East Coast but it was the fledgling state of California who greeted this modest design with open arms.

In the early days of the 20th century, California was a happening place. Between 1920 and 1929 the population of Los Angeles more than doubled, partly due to a tremendous influx of immigrant families finding work in growing industries. Hollywood was generating more than income; it was mass producing and disseminating American culture. An oil boom is largely responsible for placing California as the largest player in the aviation industry, the home of several large banking corporations, and the beneficiaries of an explosive real estate market.

As the population increased middle class American families who, up until this point, had largely rented city apartments were enabled to move outward into the wide and undeveloped lands beyond the urban city center. California Bungalow homes, with their one-story designs and open floor plans, were affordable to build and maintain. Because the homes were small, even a modest lot offered a yard space, typically in the back of the house.

california-bungalow kit edited

A kit illustration for an early California Bungalow style home

In previous years home ownership was mostly relegated to the wealthy, and the designs reflected this opulence. Servant’s quarters, formal spaces like sitting rooms and parlors, and expansive guest suites characterized the luxury homes of the well-off. The introduction of the California Bungalow home, however, brought home ownership down to the level of the successful working class American family. Materials came from local surrounding areas and prioritized stucco,  wood shingle, or horizontal siding instead of the early brick versions seen on the East Coast. Redwood beams became a common style characteristic. Sometimes sold in ready-to-assemble kits, one could even purchase a bungalow home from the Sears and Roebuck catalog!

 

By the end of the 1930’s, the California Bungalow style was on the decline. As Americans recovered from the war and the G.I. Bill helped returning soldiers build a sustainable life, the development of the suburbs saw homes getting larger and larger as American culture swelled towards opulence once again.

In today’s modern world of technology-enhanced experiences, dense urban populations, and multi-tasking families, the Bungalow home is seeing a resurgence. The floor plans typically place a large gathering space at the center of the home with the other rooms organized in a connected constellation around it. This open, casual feel is widely popular with families looking to balance out the distractions of the world with a home that brings family members together and integrates everyone’s living experience.

This modern California bungalow home boasts elegant efficiency with a nod to the classic historical design.

This modern California bungalow home boasts elegant efficiency with a nod to the classic historical design.

An early piece of American cultural history, the California Bungalow is sturdy and adaptable home that has already proven its worth against the shifting tides of sociocultural change.

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The Keeping Room Returns to Home Design

Among the trends in contemporary home design is a return to “the Old Ways”, and families are once again including a keeping room in their modern house plans.

For Colonial houses, architecture was highly focused on function over aesthetics. Life was hard, seasonal weather changes caused major shifts in lifestyle, and the demands on early American settlers were high. Houses at that time were highly influenced by English and European trends, but materials were limited to what could be found nearby and luxury was a thing of imagination. These sturdy folk built homes to withstand intense weather; exteriors favored stone and brick, and the floor plans only included what was absolutely necessary- usually small homes designed around a central keeping room. Excess in design would not come until many decades later, when affluence begins to gain footing American culture.

Colonial Architecture

An early Colonial-style home in Pennsylvania.

But in these early years homes were sparse and industrial, providing shelter and warmth and working space for families who toiled relentlessly, often in conditions unimaginable to us now. Modern house plans have evolved in countless ways and show the influence of the wide world we now live in. Creativity has taken hold in architecture, and our homes reflect the freedom to imagine and to design spaces with aesthetics in mind, instead of mere function.

Learning From the Past

In many parts of the country those old Colonial homes still stand, and we can look to them for inspiration. As modern life gets more and more hectic and divided, we see a hearkening back to the way people lived before all this distraction started affecting our families. Among the many trends in contemporary home design is a return to “the Old Ways”, and families are favoring a nod toward simpler times and natural architectural features. We see this demonstrated strongly in the return of the keeping room to modern house plans.

 

The keeping room serves a gathering place for busy families.

The keeping room served as a gathering place for busy families in early American colonies.

The keeping room originated in the late 1700’s. Located just off the kitchen the keeping room, or hearth room, featured a large fireplace and was often the only room in the house to be heated. It served as a gathering place for inside work and food preparation. During cold winter months, inside chores would be done here, and often families would all sleep together by the hearth for warmth. In larger Colonial homes, older children would often sleep in an upstairs attic, located above the keeping room, where the heat from the fire would warm the room upstairs.

Modern Keeping Rooms

While design ideas are infinite, the one element that traditionally makes this space a keeping room is a fireplace. In contemporary homes, the keeping room serves still as a gathering place for families often divided and multitasking. Also useful for those who have a tendency to entertain, the keeping room acts as a spill-over space for guests who naturally gather in the kitchen while final meal preparations are being seen to. For families with school age children, this room can be a place where homework is finished and school projects are completed. With its close proximity to the kitchen and, often, to other rooms in an open floor plan, this space is well connected to the rest of the house, providing a feeling of inclusion and comfort.

socks around a firelace

Design Features

This is typically a space of coziness and simple decoration. Many families choose to have this room be (relatively) technology free; the flat screen, media equipment, gaming consoles, and other screen activities are often placed in other rooms, like a family or game room. Instead, the keeping room will typically be focused on conversation or relaxation. A subtle docking station for music players might be the only tech gear present. Overstuffed arm chairs and a wide, low coffee table encourage a coffee break hangout; simple slip-covered parson’s chairs, bookshelves, and occasional tables make a perfect after-dinner gathering space.

Even a small space can provide comfort and relaxation.

Even a small space can provide comfort and relaxation.

The key to the keeping room is that it is a flexible space intended for people to move through and about the room as comfort indicates. Avoid clutter and complex décor, and opt instead for comfy, casual, easily approachable embellishments. This is a room that can be designed entirely based upon how you use it, so feel free to break the so-called rules. Do what feels comfortable to your family. This is a place that should draw people towards it, so go with comfort over exhibition.

Include A Keeping Room in your Custom Home

A keeping room often becomes the center of a household, anchoring family members to a core gathering space. To get started, use the Advanced Search option to filter house plans with keeping room or hearth rooms already included. Don’t see one you like? Talk to the architect about the plans you like; many bonus rooms and flex spaces can be adjusted to easily adapt into a keeping room to give your modern dream home a touch of the Old Ways.

A contemporary keeping room uses natural stone and exposed beams to balance the light from big windows.

A contemporary keeping room uses natural stone and exposed beams to balance the light from big windows.

Search house plans with keeping rooms here. 

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Home Gym Design

At different times of the year- and at different stages in life- our physical fitness rises up on the priority list. And in this we are often met with an overwhelming amount of information about what kind of exercise is best, which foods should be avoided, and just how to go about shedding those excess pounds. While it can be difficult to filter through the advice there are some things that can make this process a little easier to navigate. Perhaps the easiest solution of all is to create a home gym that can adapt to your needs as they change.

home gym

Big windows help this home gym feel open and expansive.

A home gym is often quite different from commercial workout spaces. Rather than a huge room lined with mirrors, rows of cardio equipment and weight machines, and a huge assemblage of kettle balls and free weights, a home gym can be a sleeker, simpler space. In addition to the fact that you won’t need all that equipment for just a few people, you are also enabled to craft your space in a way that cultivates a calm determination.

A small room will suffice for your home gym, but I recommend it be a room you enjoy spending time in. Choose a space with big windows and a view if you can, but free of distractions. Natural light is a big bonus and helps with both mood improvement and motivation. If natural light isn’t an option in your space, choose a lighting scheme that is gentle but provides ample illumination for your workouts.

Depending on what kinds of physical activities you’re planning on doing, flooring can be an important component of your home gym.  For many folks the home gym is a simple situation, and flooring materials can be of your choosing. Hard wood or wood alternatives create a warm, inviting feeling but can be in danger of damage if weights are dropped. Choose a hardy material that can stand up to the activity that will take place.

Work with your architectural team to customize that bonus room or flex space into your home gym.  Rather than just moving equipment into an empty space, you can cultivate a deliberate experience when working with a professional designer. Built-ins, light sources, and structural adjustments can be added to your existing house plan, ensuring that your dream home comes together exactly as you envision it.

Search our large selection of house plans with home gyms here.

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Nine Breath-Taking Ideas for a Summer Fireplace

For most folks, the summer months are too hot to justify using the fireplace, and for others these traditional built ins are not functional during any time of the year. Either way, a fireplace is designed to draw your eye and creates a central focal point in the room. Even when not in use, resist the temptation to ignore your fireplace in warmer months. These nine suggestions will get you ready for a summer fireplace that stands out in a crowd.

  1. Plants

    summer fireplace

    Plants add a pop of color and vibrancy to a space that can be dark and cool.

During the summer months, go big and green with vibrant indoor plants like ferns, ZZs, and ivy; or build a succulent garden with jade plants, cacti, and hens and chicks. Choose funky pots and layer them in the firebox where they will stay cool during the hot months while bringing a pop of bright summer color to your great room.

 

 

summer fireplace

The fireplace can showcase items of special importance.

2. Artwork Display

For large sculptures or statues, use the natural eye-catching design of the fireplace for displaying these large pieces. Opt for a simple design so as not to detract from the artwork itself and the space transforms into a stunning shadowbox.

 

  1. Light up the logs!

    summer fireplace

    Use string lights to illuminate wood logs.

Stack real firewood in the firebox and use either tea light candles or thin strings of white lights to illuminate the space. For candles, use a drill to create “holders” in the wood for the tea lights and make certain that the logs are stacked in a completely stable fashion to minimize any risk of tipping while the candles are lit. Alternatively, wind wire-strand lights around the logs for a fairy-light look on a nearly invisible strand.

  1. Photo Display

Organize framed photographs of various sizes and heights in the fireplace to draw attention to the things that matter most to your family. Use mix-match frames and color photos of people and places for a funky, casual look, or use matching frames with black-and-white images for a classy, minimalist feel.

  1. Occasional Tables

If you have a small side table or console table not is use this could be the perfect place for it this summer! Setting an occasional table in front of the fireplace bring the space forward and provides a display space for lovely items or an additional resting spot for drinks and plates during a summertime gathering.

6. Wood Storage

summer fireplace

Artistically stacked wood makes a lovely display and doubles as wood storage.

Consider stacking firewood in the fireplace over the summer in a decorative way, using up the entire space for a fitted wooden panel. The play of stone or brick with natural wood is both interesting and functional. For a funky feel, paint the ends of some or all of the wood logs in bright colors to accent other statement pieces in the room.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Shelves

    summer fireplace

    Book shelves in the fireplace make for a compelling conversation piece.

Simple shelves installed into the fireplace can be either temporary for a summer display or permanent for a non-functional fireplace. Fill the shelves with books for an unusual library or display books of special import for a bookshelf that is both functional and aesthetically compelling.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Cover it up!

If you’re not inclined to use the firebox for a display case this summer, or just didn’t get around to cleaning it out, you can always cover it up with a solid screen. Find something made with natural materials such as wicker or woven grass for a summertime feel.

  1. Mirrors

    summer fireplace

    Mirrors expand the space and maximize light.

Mirrors might be the single best way to help a small space feel larger. Like with the shelf suggestion above, you can either go permanent or temporary with this idea. A mirror the same size as the fireplace can be mounted against the back wall to visually expand the floor space and reflect the room back to the viewer. Alternatively, mirrors in frames can be layered in the firebox to reflect light at different angles and brighten the space.

 

Click here to see all of our favorites ideas on Pinterest.

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Build a Clever Cat Yard

It’s not just dogs that want time outdoors when the weather warms up: cats also enjoy fresh air and a chance to catch some rays. But as most feline fanciers know, cats who roam unsupervised outside often have a much shorter life expectancy than their indoor counterparts, due to the many dangers they face. Cats can also be a neighborhood nuisance, digging in flower beds and hunting small bird populations that some homeowners cultivate. The solution? An enclosed outside space designed for your cat’s entertainment and safety. The “catio” as some are calling it, is growing in popularity and popping up everywhere from big yards to apartment windows. Here are a few things to consider when building your own cat yard:

Full Enclosure

Cat yard

Full enclosures are necessary to ensure your cat’s safety.

Remember that cats are expert climbers as well as boundary-pushers. They will, by nature, try to find a way to get beyond the space you have designed for them, if only for the sake of exploration. Use materials that are difficult for cats to maneuver through, like chicken wire or fine wire mesh. Don’t be tempted to skimp on the structure of the enclosed cat yard; secure the ends and edges well to keep your kitty safe.

 

 

cat yard

Cats love to climb up high to take in the view.

Climbing Structures

Cats love to view the world from on high and survey their surroundings. By creating vertical spaces in your cat yard for them to climb on and hang out in, you provide valuable stimulus for your felines. Floating shelf-type steps up a vertical wall work well for this, so long as they are mounted securely enough to hold your cat’s weight.

 

 

cat yard

Tunnels and above ground walkways are feline favorites

Tunnels

Open-air tunnels made of screen material give cats a place to stretch their legs and “chase” after birds or squirrels without endangering them. If you have lots of space in your cat yard to work with, consider an above ground “cat run” leading from one enclosed space to another.

Window Terrace

Even if you don’t have a lot of yard space to work with- or no yard at all- you can still design a clever cat yard hangout spot. Building off of a window, anchor an enclosed structure to the building outside to provide a sunny, fresh-air escape and a good lookout spot from which your cat can monitor the activities of the neighborhood.

Pre-fab Cat Enclosures

If you don’t have the time or desire to design a cat yard, there are many premade options to choose from. These have the added benefit of being a temporary enclosure, good for families that could be moving in the future, or are preparing for a backyard renovation. Check out the PAWS website suggestions for these products here.

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